Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Secrets to Wintertime Fishing Part II

In the winter months, the rules change dramatically for shallow water anglers. Water temperatures can swing wildly. Be flexible and thoughtful with your approach, being in tune with water temperatures and wind. Shallow water warms up the fastest but also cools off the fastest, so plan your day for the warmest water. Cold incoming tides or a cold north wind can cool off your favorite place and evacuate fish. Shallow water temperatures above 60 degrees will draw fish to enter, and the warmer the water gets, the better chance for feeding fish. So, between now and Spring (which can’t come soon enough as far as I’m concerned…), here are a few more secrets to fishing success in the winter months:

Pick your days! Fishing “between the fronts” offers blue bird days with light winds, clear skies and clear water. Fish that have been laid up in deeper water during a cold norther blow will eventually emerge onto the flats in search of a little food. Target those warmer, less windy days a few days after a front has blown through to find more feeding fish in shallow water. Spoil islands, like the ones found lining the Intracoastal Canal, absorb the sunshine and warm the water around them. These are some of the most productive places to fish in the winter. Here, the combination of warmer water disseminating from the spoil islands and the close proximity to the deep water of the Intracoastal provide a great place for predators to hang out in comfort and safety.

Find bait. No bait, no fish. Move on. The reason there is no bait is the same reason there are no predators. The water temperature isn’t right or you are too far from deep, protected water. Clue in if you are fishing and you don’t see bait in the water. Keep searching.

Avoid any area that has a lot of current, either wind-blown or tidal. This is one of the only times of the year that non-moving water works in an anglers favor. Warm, consistent temperatures are what feeding fish are seeking and any cold, incoming flow can turn a sun-warmed 68 degree flat into an unsustainable 57 degrees in a hurry.

Oyster shells exposed at night can get really cold. During the day, this cold emanates into the water around them and could make that water unfishable. If you like to fish flats that have lots of oyster reefs, keep this in mind.

As the air and water temperatures drop, sharpen up your casting skills and move slow. When the water is cold, the fish move slowly. They are conserving all of their energy. When they feed, they move slowly. Predators are unwilling to expend a lot of energy while feeding in these colder conditions. An accurate cast will catch more fish. Don’t expect a predator to pursue a fly or lure three feet or more. They will not do it. Put it in the proximity of their mouth and they will make the strike. When you do drop the fly or lure into a fish’s “dinner plate zone”, move it slow. Hop it up and down, puff it on the bottom, and wait for it to be detected. Give the fish some time to meander over and pick up the prey, then, slowly set the hook. Cold water, clear water and light winds demand finesse in presentation and accuracy, whether you are fly fishing or lure casting.

On calm days, you may have to cast beyond the target so as not to spook your fish, and then bring the lure into the “zone”. Make the “magic transect”, where the lure is presented to the fish perpendicular to his face. No bait in the natural world would come up from behind or chase a predator. The more natural the presentation, the more fish you will catch. This premise certainly holds true all year, however.

So, don’t give up on fishing just because it’s not summer! The winter can be some of the best shallow water fishing of the entire year! Follow the rules and be thoughtful about your fishing and you will find and catch lots of feeding fish! Rockport water levels have been very low and the shorelines of the Superflats, Mud Island and Allyn’s Bight have been loaded up with reds. Great big, giant, trophy trout are hanging out in their usual wintertime places along the spoil islands of Estes Flats and Redfish Bay, up tight to the shorelines. Baffin Bay shorelines have been also been chuck full of redfish on sunny afternoons. The fall and early winter of 2010 will go down in history as some of the best sight casting of all times. This winter is really shaping up for some dynamic action, and, as long as we don’t get a lot of extended cold weather (like last year), you can bet it’s going to stay that way.

Duck hunting is off the charts in Baffin Bay and my pup Kelly has been getting lots of great work with our clients. She’s only two, but has all the talent a good lab needs. We are looking forward to the re-opening of the dove season on Christmas Day as the Riviera area is completely inundated with dove right now. You can see by the tone of my article, I don’t think I’ve been this fired up about fishing and hunting EVER!

Don’t let this bounty pass you by. Duck season opens back up on December 11, Dove season opens up on December 25th, and they both close mid-January. Try and put some of it on your schedule, as well as some world-class sight casting for reds and trout!

On December 7th, Capt. Aubrey Black and I were both awarded a certificate by the City of Corpus Christi’s Convention and Visitor’s Bureau as we both completed an extensive Wildlife Guide Certification Program. We learned a lot about all of the different species of fish, birds and plants, as well as the history of our area, business practices, customer service and so much more. It was a fantastic program and I am very proud that we were chosen to be two of the inaugural class of 13 outdoors enthusiasts! It is the first program of its kind anywhere, and we are both hoping to help the visitors to our area appreciate just what a great outdoors experience it is!

Monday, December 13, 2010

Secrets to Wintertime Fishing Part 1

Saltwater Angler Magazine – On-Line Edition
November 10, 2010

For shallow water anglers, one of the best times of the year is in full swing right now. November and December give us moderate temperatures, some cool nights and mornings along with really hungry fish. Duck hunting has been fantastic and looks to be good for the rest of the session, especially here in Baffin Bay. Many new migratory birds are showing up daily and the sunrises and sunsets are especially beautiful.

Fly fishing and sightcasting has been very productive both in Rockport and in Baffin Bay the past couple of weeks. The water levels have been very, very low, which makes for some fantastic fishing, as the back lakes and some flats are virtually empty. All of the major shorelines have good concentrations of both redfish and trout. Find sand strips and grass, potholes and protected waters up close and you’ll have fish to cast at.

Rockport, like the old friend that it is, has been consistently serving up nice pods of tailing fish on moving waters and lots and lots of singles and doubles cruising around. Although there are no shortages of good fish to cast at, the real challenge has been to spot them quickly and cast at them before they spook off. The water there is just beautiful in the flats and on major shorelines, and I poled a large majority of them this past week.

Since fishing Baffin Bay and the surrounding areas in the past year or so, the stark differences in fish behavior really became evident. Fishing both bay systems has offered some fresh perspective on several topics which has been very interesting and insightful.

For the same reason the trout are bigger in Baffin Bay, so are the redfish. And, the fact that Baffin and this area are so far away from any water inflows, like the Packery Channel and the East Cut in Port Mansfield, there is no tide movement. Sure, water levels change slightly from time to time, but there is no dramatic, daily water movement in Baffin Bay. So, redfish and trout tend to stay around and just eat, without lots of nomadic movement looking for the best water conditions or food. It’s all right there and pretty consistent.

For a tidal and water level fisherman like me, this was a big change. Fishing the tide and water level movement in Rockport means everything. In Baffin Bay, it means nothing. So, finding feeding fish in Baffin is a little bit more structure-based with wind as the only means of “tide” (current). Water clarity in Baffin Bay and the surrounding areas can be as clear as Rockport, or slightly off-colored. It really doesn’t matter because the fish are just bigger in Baffin and they can be seen pretty easily in the shallow water. Everyone fishes the shallow water in Rockport, almost no one fishes the shallow water in Baffin. The fish are perfectly comfortable there, not run over by boats, not pressured on a daily basis. Consequently, they are just plain dumb. And when they are in the shallow water, they are most probably actively looking for food.

Whether Rockport or Baffin, the same water temperature rules apply for late fall fishing. Find the warmest, most protected water and avoid cold water inflows to find consistent, feeding fish.

Begin your fishing somewhere in the mid-morning, after the shallow water has had a little time to absorb the heat of the sun. Fish shorelines, spoil islands or flats protected from the wind, with darker grass or muddy bottoms, or even slightly off-colored water and deeper potholes. Dark grass and mud and the tiny, floating particulates of the off-colored water absorb the heat of the sun faster, making these the places that the fish will seek out first.

Fish shallow areas close to deeper water, such as the Intracoastal Waterway. Along the Texas Coast, the Intracoastal can be the “bomb shelter” where fish drop into when water temperatures fall dramatically. Fish do go deep when the water gets cold, that’s how they survive. It might be 57 degrees at the bottom of the Intracoastal, but it’s a consistent 57 degrees. A shallow flat can drop quickly into the danger zone for fish survival after the sun goes down and cold night temperatures set in.

Fly casters throw dark crab patterns on the sand, or the old standby, a white and chartreuse or red and white clouser . Move up a size, so instead of throwing a size 6 fly, try a size 4 or 2. When fish do eat in the winter, they tend to eat bigger baits for more “bang for their buck”. Lure chunkers toss weightless or near-weightless soft plastics on no-wind days for a super quiet presentation. Other lures that work great in the winter are the Corky Fatboy, Corky Devil, Baby -1 crank bait, Chattertube, Catch 2000 and the Cotton Cordell Brokenback. All of these lures are made to sink slowly and/or to be moved slowly. Don’t rush them, they are supposed to suspend and wiggle just enough to look natural in the cold water environment.

Shallow water anglers in-the-know are out on the water every day that the conditions allow. Consider the secrets to finding feeding fish and you’ll be amazed at the quality of angling that can be done in the wintertime!

See you on the water!

Capt. Sally Black
Website: www.CaptainSally.com
Email: Sally@CaptainSally.com
Facebook: Capt. Sally Black and Capt. Sally’s Reel Fun Charters
Blog: CaptSallysBlog.blogspot.com
Twitter: CaptainSally

Monday, November 15, 2010

In the Winter, It's All About Comfort!

Saltwater Texas
Winter Issue
November 9, 2010

In the wintertime, it’s all about comfort….

In the winter months, the rules change dramatically for shallow water anglers. Water temperatures can swing wildly. Be flexible and thoughtful with your approach, being in tune with water temperatures and wind. Shallow water warms up the fastest but also cools off the fastest, so plan your day for the warmest water. Cold incoming tides or a cold north wind can cool off your favorite place and evacuate fish. Shallow water temperatures above 60 degrees will draw fish to enter, and the warmer the water gets, the better chance for feeding fish.

Fishing “between the fronts” offers blue bird days with light winds, clear skies and clear water. Fish that have been laid up in deeper water during a cold norther blow will eventually emerge onto the flats in search of a little food.

Begin your fishing somewhere in the mid-morning, after the shallow water has had a little time to absorb the heat of the sun. Fish shorelines, spoil islands or flats protected from the wind, with darker grass or muddy bottoms, or even slightly off-colored water and deeper potholes. Dark grass and mud and the tiny, floating particulates of the off-colored water absorb the heat of the sun faster, making these the places that the fish will seek out first.

Fish shallow areas close to deeper water, such as the Intracoastal Waterway. Along the Texas Coast, the Intracoastal can be the “bomb shelter” where fish drop into when water temperatures fall dramatically. Fish do go deep when the water gets cold, that’s how they survive. It might be 57 degrees at the bottom of the Intracoastal, but it’s a consistent 57 degrees. A shallow flat can drop quickly into the danger zone for fish survival after the sun goes down and cold night temperatures set in.

Spoil islands absorb the sunshine and warm the water around them. One of the most productive places to fish in the winter is around the spoil islands that line the Intracoastal Canal. Here, the combination of warmer water disseminating from the spoil islands and the close proximity to the deep water of the Intracoastal provide a great place for predators to hang out in comfort and safety.

Find bait. No bait, no fish. Move on. The reason there is no bait is the same reason there are no predators. The water temperature isn’t right or you are too far from deep, protected water. Clue in if you are fishing and you don’t see bait in the water. Keep searching.

Avoid any area that has a lot of current, either wind-blown or tidal. This is one of the only times of the year that non-moving water works in an anglers favor. Warm, consistent temperatures are what feeding fish are seeking and any cold, incoming flow can turn a sun-warmed 68 degree flat into an unsustainable 57 degrees in a hurry.

Oyster shells exposed at night can get really cold. During the day, this cold emanates into the water around them and could make that water unfishable. If you like to fish flats that have lots of oyster reefs, keep this in mind.

As the air and water temperatures drop, sharpen up your casting skills and move slow. When the water is cold, the fish move slowly. They are conserving all of their energy. When they feed, they move slowly. Predators are unwilling to expend a lot of energy while feeding in these colder conditions. An accurate cast will catch more fish. Don’t expect a predator to pursue a fly or lure three feet or more. They will not do it. Put it in the proximity of their mouth and they will make the strike. When you do drop the fly or lure into a fish’s “dinner plate zone”, move it slow. Hop it up and down, puff it on the bottom, and wait for it to be detected. Give the fish some time to meander over and pick up the prey, then, slowly set the hook. Cold water, clear water and light winds demand finesse in presentation and accuracy, whether you are fly fishing or lure casting.

Fly casters throw dark crab patterns on the sand, or the old standby, a white and chartreuse or red and white clouser . Move up a size, so instead of throwing a size 6 fly, try a size 4 or 2. When fish do eat in the winter, they tend to eat bigger baits for more “bang for their buck”. Lure chunkers toss weightless or near-weightless soft plastics on no-wind days for a super quiet presentation. Other lures that work great in the winter are the Corky Fatboy, Corky Devil, Baby -1 crank bait, Chattertube, Catch 2000 and the Cotton Cordell Brokenback. All of these lures are made to sink slowly and/or to be moved slowly. Don’t rush them, they are supposed to suspend and wiggle just enough to look natural in the cold water environment.

On calm days, you may have to cast beyond the target so as not to spook your fish, and then bring the lure into the “zone”. Make the “magic transect”, where the lure is presented to the fish perpendicular to his face. No bait in the natural world would come up from behind or chase a predator. The more natural the presentation, the more fish you will catch. This premise certainly holds true all year, however.

Shallow water anglers in-the-know are out on the water every day that the conditions allow. Consider the secrets to finding feeding fish and you’ll be amazed at the quality of angling that can be done in the wintertime!

Thursday, November 11, 2010

Saltwater Angler Magazine Fishing Report - November 10, 2010






Saltwater Angler Magazine – On-Line Edition
November 10, 2010

For shallow water anglers, one of the best times of the year is in full swing right now. November and December give us moderate temperatures, some cool nights and mornings along with really hungry fish. Duck hunting has been fantastic and looks to be good for the rest of the session, especially here in Baffin Bay. Many new migratory birds are showing up daily and the sunrises and sunsets are especially beautiful.

Fly fishing and sightcasting has been very productive both in Rockport and in Baffin Bay the past couple of weeks. The water levels have been very, very low, which makes for some fantastic fishing, as the back lakes and some flats are virtually empty. All of the major shorelines have good concentrations of both redfish and trout. Find sand strips and grass, potholes and protected waters up close and you’ll have fish to cast at.

Rockport, like the old friend that it is, has been consistently serving up nice pods of tailing fish on moving waters and lots and lots of singles and doubles cruising around. Although there are no shortages of good fish to cast at, the real challenge has been to spot them quickly and cast at them before they spook off. The water there is just beautiful in the flats and on major shorelines, and I poled a large majority of them this past week.

Since fishing Baffin Bay and the surrounding areas in the past year or so, the stark differences in fish behavior really became evident. Fishing both bay systems has offered some fresh perspective on several topics which has been very interesting and insightful.

For the same reason the trout are bigger in Baffin Bay, so are the redfish. And, the fact that Baffin and this area are so far away from any water inflows, like the Packery Channel and the East Cut in Port Mansfield, there is no tide movement. Sure, water levels change slightly from time to time, but there is no dramatic, daily water movement in Baffin Bay. So, redfish and trout tend to stay around and just eat, without lots of nomadic movement looking for the best water conditions or food. It’s all right there and pretty consistent.

For a tidal and water level fisherman like me, this was a big change. Fishing the tide and water level movement in Rockport means everything. In Baffin Bay, it means nothing. So, finding feeding fish in Baffin is a little bit more structure-based with wind as the only means of “tide” (current). Water clarity in Baffin Bay and the surrounding areas can be as clear as Rockport, or slightly off-colored. It really doesn’t matter because the fish are just bigger in Baffin and they can be seen pretty easily in the shallow water. Everyone fishes the shallow water in Rockport, almost no one fishes the shallow water in Baffin. The fish are perfectly comfortable there, not run over by boats, not pressured on a daily basis. Consequently, they are just plain dumb. And when they are in the shallow water, they are most probably actively looking for food.




Whether Rockport or Baffin, the same water temperature rules apply for late fall fishing. Find the warmest, most protected water and avoid cold water inflows to find consistent, feeding fish.

Begin your fishing somewhere in the mid-morning, after the shallow water has had a little time to absorb the heat of the sun. Fish shorelines, spoil islands or flats protected from the wind, with darker grass or muddy bottoms, or even slightly off-colored water and deeper potholes. Dark grass and mud and the tiny, floating particulates of the off-colored water absorb the heat of the sun faster, making these the places that the fish will seek out first.

Fish shallow areas close to deeper water, such as the Intracoastal Waterway. Along the Texas Coast, the Intracoastal can be the “bomb shelter” where fish drop into when water temperatures fall dramatically. Fish do go deep when the water gets cold, that’s how they survive. It might be 57 degrees at the bottom of the Intracoastal, but it’s a consistent 57 degrees. A shallow flat can drop quickly into the danger zone for fish survival after the sun goes down and cold night temperatures set in.

Fly casters throw dark crab patterns on the sand, or the old standby, a white and chartreuse or red and white clouser . Move up a size, so instead of throwing a size 6 fly, try a size 4 or 2. When fish do eat in the winter, they tend to eat bigger baits for more “bang for their buck”. Lure chunkers toss weightless or near-weightless soft plastics on no-wind days for a super quiet presentation. Other lures that work great in the winter are the Corky Fatboy, Corky Devil, Baby -1 crank bait, Chattertube, Catch 2000 and the Cotton Cordell Brokenback. All of these lures are made to sink slowly and/or to be moved slowly. Don’t rush them, they are supposed to suspend and wiggle just enough to look natural in the cold water environment.

Shallow water anglers in-the-know are out on the water every day that the conditions allow. Consider the secrets to finding feeding fish and you’ll be amazed at the quality of angling that can be done in the wintertime!

See you on the water!

Capt. Sally Black
Website: www.CaptainSally.com
Email: Sally@CaptainSally.com
Facebook: Capt. Sally Black and Capt. Sally’s Reel Fun Charters
Blog: CaptSallysBlog.blogspot.com
Twitter: CaptainSally

Saltwater Angler Report - September 9, 2010

Saltwater Angler On-Line Edition
September 9, 2010

It’s been an interesting end of the summer…. High water, low water, lots of rain, great pushes of blue water, schools of jacks, schools of migrating redfish and everything in between. Shallow water anglers have been offered the entire gamut of conditions to experience recently. The good news, however, is that the catching has been consistently good, even under some tough conditions.

With the advent of a few cooler mornings recently, a change is in the air. Even though summer will wear on, there will be days mixed in where a hint of fall will sneak through. Getting ready for dove hunting, which opens on September 17th in the South Zone is the official kick-off of a new season of the year. It looks like hunting is going to be fantastic down in the Riviera area which is inundated with dove right now. Early teal looks good here as well, with big flocks being sighted in the Alazan Bay area.

Last year was my first season as a hunting guide and I got hopelessly addicted to the sport. My black lab, Kelly, who is now two years old made it so much fun! I am really looking forward to our second year as it looks like the conditions and the wingshooting will be very good.

Shallow water fishing in the Rockport area has been very good as of late, with lots of pods of tailing redfish and some really big schools being sighted in the usual places. This is the time of year to keep your eye out for those migrating groups of hungry redfish, heading out to the gulf passes. The “usual places” to look for these migrating herds are the outside beach of Traylor Island near Trout Bayou, Corpus Christi Bayou and Yucca Cut, the Lydia Ann Channel, Quarantine Shoreline and the Super Flats. Don’t forget to look in Allyn’s Bight and along the San Jose Island Shoreline as well.

Watch for birds diving down, bait jumping and the tell-tale “copper/orange water” patches that give these big groups away. Toss anything into the mix and it will be eaten. Whether fly fishing or lure casting, it’s a no-brainer!

Same scenario in the super shallow waters when coming across pods of tailing redfish. Toss almost anything at this time of the year, and it will be eaten. Once a fall fishing pattern becomes established, anything goes. As a new shrimp migration begins to arrive within the next few weeks, it’s a full-on food fest for redfish and trout eating up after the lull of summer. As water temperatures begin to drop, even ever-so-slightly, the message is being received that the seasons are changing.

Small topwaters, like the Super Spook, Jr. and the small Skitterwalk in light and dark colors like bone, chrome, pink and black are working great. Lately, the soft plastic that has been producing is the Saltwater Assassin small paddletail on a 1/16th ounce jig head and a #2 hook. Natural colors in clear waters or darker colors on cloudy days work great, either with a straight retrieve or a jigging retrieve, depending on the mood of the fish that day.


Sunny days and clear waters are always good for the venerable gold spoon, in 1/4th or 1/8th ounce sizes. When there is a lack of floating grass, try a Waker or a crankbait for some fun action. Both reds and trout can’t resist these two lures.

Fly anglers sightcast to these fish with chartreuse and white Foxy Clousers, bigger Seaducers and light-weight crab patterns in natural colors, depending on the water depth and conditions. It’s still important to be accurate with your casts. Presenting the fly as naturally as possible will produce the best strikes. Make the “magic transect” by crossing the path of the redfish with your fly. A fish can’t say no to this presentation.

Whether fly fishing or tossing lures, the best places to look for pods of tails are any flat or back lake with good, short grass with water levels at knee-deep or less. Moving tides prompt better feeding activity so plan your day around these water flows, either in or out.

September is a transition month for everyone. Getting back to school and football, running out of summer vacation time, planning for dove hunting, getting the deer lease ready and preparing for fall fishing has everyone working hard in all of their spare time. It’s tough to get enough of anything accomplished right now, but it’s well worth the effort. This is a magical time of the year.

And speaking of magical, on August 28th, Capt. Aubrey Black and I got married on the sand bar at Los Corrallos at sunrise. 85 of our friends and family were there with us as we said our vows, standing knee-deep in the waters of Baffin Bay. What an honor and a privilege it was to share our joy with everyone. Marrying the love of my life, who just happens to be a fishing and hunting guide too, has been the most exciting and interesting thing I have ever done. I’ll still be fishing Rockport, but I’ll be adding Baffin Bay hunting and fishing to my repertoire as well. Nothing has really changed, except for my last name, and the prospects for the remainder of this year for hunting and fishing are very bright, to say the least!

See you on the water!
Capt. Sally

Website: www.CaptainSally.com
Email: Sally@CaptainSally.com
Facebook: Capt. Sally’s Reel Fun Charters and Sally Ann Black
Blog: www.captainsallysblog.blogspot.com
Twitter: CaptainSally

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

August 11, 2010 Fishing Report, Saltwater Angler Magazine

Saltwater Angler
On-line Edition
August 11, 2010

After spending the majority of the past two weeks on the water in the Rockport area, fishing in the hot part of the summer is a real art form. Since the fish have no real signals from Mother Nature that anything is happening in their lives, they only feed when the water is moving. There is plenty of bait around and the fish are fat and happy.

Finding feeding fish revolves around cooler water and tide or wind driven currents. Early in the morning, begin your search closest to the best water movements, like jetties or fish passes. Whether incoming or outgoing, this early morning water flow can start the day off right. The shallow water is the coolest in the morning and the bait and predators that follow seek this out. On low water days, find fish on shorelines that are near your favorite shallow water fishing areas. On high water days, go into the shallowest water you can find.

Large schools of redfish can be found now starting to gather up for their annual migration. These feeding packs of predators can be seen roaming up and down the usual shorelines such as Mud Island, Super Flats, Quarantine, San Jose and Traylor. Watch for large wakes, frothy water and frantic bait fish as these redfish move along and feed as a group.

Talk about frothy water! The Jack Attacks have begun in the Rockport area. If you are interested in catching a Jack Crevalle on conventional tackle or a fly rod, make sure you’ve got the right gear on board. From 15 to 40 pounds, these toothy critters can wreck your medium light tackle and take all of your 12 pound test line. Fly anglers, toss your 8 weight line and you might be making a trip to the Swan Pointe Landing Orvis Shop in Rockport for some new line and backing. Nothing less than a 10 weight rigged with the right leader and tippet will do for these big, powerful Jacks. Go see Dave at Orvis and get the best advice on the coast. Conventional anglers toss a big topwater into the washing machine water as these Jacks are feeding, but make sure that you’ve got a rod with some backbone and maybe some 40 pound braid with an appropriate leader! I’m not kidding. This game is fun!

Paying attention to tide movements and solunar feeding periods to target feeding fish will make your hot summer fishing much more productive. Edges, shorelines and deeper flats now come into play, but the super skinny water is still fair game, especially earlier in the day before the sun heats it up into “mullet soup”. Floating grass is a big problem, but not until after noon or so. Topwater fishing in the early mornings is very productive. Look for lots of mullet moving in the “right” level water, such as knee deep or so. The 1/8th ounce gold spoon is a go-to for sightcasting to cruising or tailing redfish.

Fly anglers toss the white/chartreuse or all white Foxy Clouser, visible crab pattern or a spoon fly. Target really shallow areas with short grass near deeper water.

The fall migration of redfish will be the main focus of many anglers, but trout fishing is still great on the deeper grass edges. Add to that the opportunities to run off shore when the winds subside and the blue water comes in and the Jack Attacks in the channels near the jetties and you’ve got a great mixed bag of fishing. This year, big schools of black drum have been sighted near Allyn’s Bight and the San Jose shoreline. Probably the most under-rated fish in our bay system, sightcasting to and fighting black drum is fun, but eating them is even better! Birds working frantic bait out deep might tell of big schools of ladyfish, gafftop or even trout. Keep you eyes and your mind open to all of these angling opportunities at this time of the year.

Subtle changes are occurring now, as the end of August approaches. My black lab, Kelly, is beginning to look to the sky for some reason. I guess she knows somehow that dove season is right around the corner. If you are interested in dove hunting or a cast and blast in Baffin Bay, Capt. Aubrey Black and I will be offering that again this year. Dove season should be great with all of the rain we’ve had this summer. The skies are filled right now with resident birds and more will be arriving soon.

As always, after a long, hot summer, everyone dreams of fall fishing, dove hunting and the onset of cooler weather. Our area provides such a diverse offering of outdoor activities, make every effort to enjoy what God has given us. See the sunrise as much as possible!

Capt. Sally
Website: www.CaptainSally.com
Email: Sally@CaptainSally.com
Facebook: Capt. Sally’s Reel Fun Charters and Sally Ann Moffett
Blog: www.captainsallysblog.blogspot.com
Twitter: CaptainSally

July 14th Fishing Report - Saltwater Angler Magazine

Saltwater Angler
On-Line Edition
July 14, 2010

After the bizarre twist of weather that occurred recently when two tropical systems approached very near the mid-coast of Texas, “catching” got a little interesting! At first, the fish in the shallow water were really on-board and feeding as the big push of water came in. Then, the sight casting got a little tougher, as more and more fish scattered about.

Now, however, anglers and water levels are both trying to get back to the fantastic pattern being fished before the storms blew in. After these recent rains, fishing should continue to improve all summer and for the rest of the year. It’s amazing what a big fresh water influx can do to a bay system. After Hurricane Dolly last year, Port Mansfield and the Lower Laguna Madre really became alive and the fishing there was off the charts. The size of the fish improved and the numbers went up dramatically. The effects of Dolly are still being realized today in the LLM.

Shrimp and crabs are the main source of food for shallow roaming fish now. Target areas with short, thick grass, flats with potholes close to shore and utilize any and all moving waters to find feeding fish.

In the Rockport/Port Aransas area, July and August fishing really does rely upon real-time water level changes (see http://tidesonline.nos.noaa.gov/geographic.html ). Fishing closer to the source of the tide flow makes targeting these feeding fish a little easier. Some areas of The Lighthouse Lakes, the Brown and Root Flats and South Bay can be flooded with big schools of redfish during this time, especially on heavy falling waters. Watch the tide charts, moon phase charts and feeding periods to put together your “prime time” fishing events. Think of how the bait fish might be “sucked off” the flat or lake by heavy falling tides. Don’t just think of the obvious places where bait fish might be drawn, but look closer at the connections of the marshes and lakes of your fishing place. Remember, fish move into the current to feed and this might occur at more than just the most obvious place, as in the mouth of a lake or marsh, but even further back, where other drains or guts occur.

Fly casters toss white/chartreuse clousers, crab patterns and spoon flies. No magic needed, just good fly placement and stealth, especially when the winds are calm. Light tackle anglers still throw small topwaters like the bone Super Spook, Jr.. Add a 1/8th ounce weedless gold spoon and a weedless/weightless 3” or 4” paddletail soft plastic in natural colors to your arsenal. Floating grass will become a problem, so avoiding it with lighter weight lures will increase your catching ratio.

As the summer wears on, the beautiful blue waters of the Gulf will encroach from time to time into the shallow waters, making it appear almost Caribbean. Keep a watchful eye for the opportunity to cast to Jack Crevelle and big schools of Ladyfish feeding along the edges of the Lydia Ann Channel, Shrimp Boat Channel, Super Flats and Quarantine from now until mid-September. This action can make a slow day of redfishing really come alive!

As in any other time of the year, good baitfish concentrations, baitfish jumping and birds in the area can tell a lot about the prospects of a fishing spot. All of these things mean water flow, bait movement and predators feeding. Target this, as well as good tidal movement for more dynamic “catching” in the summer!

Tropical systems bring much needed flushing to the shallows in the summer. Although the increased water levels make it tough for the angler, it really is a benefit to the fishing in the long run. Look forward to some really dynamic summertime fishing!

See you on the water!
Capt. Sally

www.CaptainSally.com
Facebook: Capt. Sally’s Reel Fun Charters (for real-time fishing reports and photos)
Twitter: CaptainSally
Blog: www.CaptainSallysBlog.blogspot.com

Thursday, July 22, 2010

Saltwater Angler Article - July 20, 2010

Saltwater Angler
On-Line Edition
July 14, 2010

After the bizarre twist of weather that occurred recently when two tropical systems approached very near the mid-coast of Texas, “catching” got a little interesting! At first, the fish in the shallow water were really on-board and feeding as the big push of water came in. Then, the sight casting got a little tougher, as more and more fish scattered about.

Now, however, anglers and water levels are both trying to get back to the fantastic pattern being fished before the storms blew in. After these recent rains, fishing should continue to improve all summer and for the rest of the year. It’s amazing what a big fresh water influx can do to a bay system. After Hurricane Dolly last year, Port Mansfield and the Lower Laguna Madre really became alive and the fishing there was off the charts. The size of the fish improved and the numbers went up dramatically. The effects of Dolly are still being realized today in the LLM.

Shrimp and crabs are the main source of food for shallow roaming fish now. Target areas with short, thick grass, flats with potholes close to shore and utilize any and all moving waters to find feeding fish.

In the Rockport/Port Aransas area, July and August fishing really does rely upon real-time water level changes (see http://tidesonline.nos.noaa.gov/geographic.html ). Fishing closer to the source of the tide flow makes targeting these feeding fish a little easier. Some areas of The Lighthouse Lakes, the Brown and Root Flats and South Bay can be flooded with big schools of redfish during this time, especially on heavy falling waters. Watch the tide charts, moon phase charts and feeding periods to put together your “prime time” fishing events. Think of how the bait fish might be “sucked off” the flat or lake by heavy falling tides. Don’t just think of the obvious places where bait fish might be drawn, but look closer at the connections of the marshes and lakes of your fishing place. Remember, fish move into the current to feed and this might occur at more than just the most obvious place, as in the mouth of a lake or marsh, but even further back, where other drains or guts occur.

Fly casters toss white/chartreuse clousers, crab patterns and spoon flies. No magic needed, just good fly placement and stealth, especially when the winds are calm. Light tackle anglers still throw small topwaters like the bone Super Spook, Jr.. Add a 1/8th ounce weedless gold spoon and a weedless/weightless 3” or 4” paddletail soft plastic in natural colors to your arsenal. Floating grass will become a problem, so avoiding it with lighter weight lures will increase your catching ratio.

As the summer wears on, the beautiful blue waters of the Gulf will encroach from time to time into the shallow waters, making it appear almost Caribbean. Keep a watchful eye for the opportunity to cast to Jack Crevelle and big schools of Ladyfish feeding along the edges of the Lydia Ann Channel, Shrimp Boat Channel, Super Flats and Quarantine from now until mid-September. This action can make a slow day of redfishing really come alive!

As in any other time of the year, good baitfish concentrations, baitfish jumping and birds in the area can tell a lot about the prospects of a fishing spot. All of these things mean water flow, bait movement and predators feeding. Target this, as well as good tidal movement for more dynamic “catching” in the summer!

Tropical systems bring much needed flushing to the shallows in the summer. Although the increased water levels make it tough for the angler, it really is a benefit to the fishing in the long run. Look forward to some really dynamic summertime fishing!

See you on the water!
Capt. Sally

www.CaptainSally.com
Facebook: Capt. Sally’s Reel Fun Charters (for real-time fishing reports and photos)
Twitter: CaptainSally
Blog: www.CaptainSallysBlog.blogspot.com

Friday, July 9, 2010

Fishing High Water Conditions

After Hurricane Alex came on shore near Brownsville, Texas last week, the water levels came up amost two feet. Now, after a small tropical depression came in about the same place, the water levels are remaining quite high. Fishing, however, has been very good! Finding really shallow water has been a challenge. Tomorrow I will be fishing with clients at the 9 Mile Hole and the Land Cut. Stand by for a fishing report! Also, check my Facebook page, "Capt. Sally's Reel Fun Charters" for fishing pictures and reports.

Thursday, June 17, 2010

The Many Stages of an Angler's Life

The Many Stages of an Angler’s Life
As seen in the June issue of "Saltwater Texas"

The memory of an angler’s first rod and reel brings forth warm emotions along with many happy and animated stories. The Zebco 202, 303 and 808 is a common thread and have been in almost every fisherman’s hands at one time or another.

My first rod and reel, an indescript short metal rod with a Zebco 202, served me quite well. Hauling up countless bluegill and sunfish, it was a workhorse that probably held the same short piece of line for many, many years. No maintenance was necessary, or even thought of. Then one day, my Dad upgraded my Zebco 202 with a shiny Zebco 303. Branching out for bigger quarry, a heartier reel with more and better line was necessary. With a new, improved reel on the old metal rod, bigger quarry came into play. Catfish, carp and perch quickly took the place of little sunfish. A few years later, a new Shakespeare fiberglass rod and a Zebco 808 told everyone that I was an accomplished angler. With such fine equipment, the sky was the limit!

Wherever a fisherman begins, the learning process never ends. Versatility is the name of the game and becoming knowledgeable about all of the different styles of fishing, whether freshwater or saltwater, is key to being a strong and proficient angler.

The starting point for many saltwater anglers was probably shrimp under a popping cork, free-lining finger mullet caught with a cast net and a 5 gallon bucket or cut mullet soaked on the bottom. The goal of any angler’s first stage of fishing is to catch fish, any fish.

Getting proficient with a wide gap hook and some live or dead bait, anglers eventually move to the second stage of fishing. With limits of fish, an electric filet knife and baggies of filets on every outing this angler has progressed. Catching lots of fish, learning about specialized gear, line, tackle and techniques, the second stage angler starts to feel pretty good about finding and catching fish on a consistent basis.

Then, even though catching fish with bait is still great, all of a sudden, there is a feeling as though there must be something more. New to the tackle box that used to hold just hooks, weights and corks, there’s an additional tray with new top waters, plastics and spoons.

Venturing off out of the boat, wading forever shorelines in search of trout slicks, tailing reds and showering bait, this angler has moved to the third stage of fishing, the search for a trophy fish. No longer obsessed with baggies of filets or limits of fish, this fisherman wades untouched waters, searches lonely shorelines and reads the water for signs of the ultimate prey.

Once achieved, many anglers move to the fourth stage of fishing. The sunrise starts the day, relieving the mind and soul of stress and anxiety. Dolphins splash nearby and a camera is always handy. A few good shots at sightcasted fish or just a day spent with best friends or family make a fishing experience so much more than catching. The angler in the fourth stage of fishing just wants to be there, on the water, experiencing all that Mother Nature has to offer for the day, whether fish are caught or not.

Wherever you are in the four stages of fishing, there will always be more to learn, more to observe and an unlimited number of experiences to be cataloged. No day is like the previous and all are cherished. The lucky angler that strives for the fourth stage of fishing will be very richly rewarded.

See you on the water with a fly rod in my hand.

Capt. Sally

Saturday, May 15, 2010

More Challenges

First, a week full of incredible winds. Now rain and lightning. Come on. I just want to fish.

Monday, May 10, 2010

The Shrimp are Here... The Shrimp are Here!!!

The wild swings in weather, wind and temperatures have taken shallow water anglers in and out of the spring pattern on an every other day basis! Finally, however, it seems that Mother Nature is starting to cooperate and so are the fish.

The tiny shrimp migration has arrived, along with a bumper crop of glass minnows and tiny crabs. Shallow areas with good grass are the host to this banquet of redfish fare. Wade fishermen shuffling along through the grass and hunting the shorelines will dislodge these tiny critters in huge numbers. Proof positive that Spring has officially arrived and so have mass quantities of reds in the back waters.

Reading the water and interpreting the signs of fish is now more important than ever. Birds feeding along a shoreline, tiny shrimp jumping out of the water, spraying glass minnows and loud splashes tell you exactly where fish are feeding. Lee shorelines with pockets and cord grass will hold single feeding fish, while large, thick grassed bodies of water will hold both tailing hardheads and tailing redfish. Redfish will be feeding on what the hardheads are kicking up out of the mud and grass. Long strips of muddy water will tell you that hardheads are working in an area. It’s a guarantee that redfish will be there as well.

Any small fly will do, but a small fly that a fish can also see is a better choice. White, white/chartreuse, white/pink are all good choices. Arctic fox and other materials that look more lifelike in the water also make a better presentation. Lure anglers toss weedless/weightless soft plastic paddletails or small weedless gold spoons. Try small topwaters as well, like a Super Spook, Jr. in bone, black, chrome or white/pink.

Don’t forget to let the fly or lure sink down into the fish’s “dinner plate zone”. Especially in the Spring, redfish feeding in packs won’t stray far to pick up a fly or lure. Let it cross their path and down in their feeding zone and it’s a sure thing. Stingray boots are a must these days as there is also a bumper crop of these dangerous critters. If you are a kayak fisherman, don’t go without boots and/or guards.

With the delay in the onset of Spring, May, June and July are quickly shaping up to offer some very dynamic fishing opportunities. Watch weather and water level charts to put yourself in the right spot at the right time for fish feeding activities!

See you on the water…
Capt. Sally

New Fan Page on Facebook!

Today, I have created a new Fan Page for Capt. Sally's Reel Fun Charters. This page will house my every day fishing comments and photos from the water. My blog will still have some posts, but the daily commentary will now be on my fan page. Please go to www.facebook.com and search for Capt. Sally's Reel Fun Charters, then become a fan!

Thursday, April 22, 2010

The Search for Un-Fished Fly Waters


Texas Outback Magazine
May-June 2010

Un-fished Fly Waters… in Texas?

On the middle Texas Coast, boat traffic, fishing pressure and airboats are something that all shallow water anglers must contend with these days. More and more people are finding out that shallow water sightcasting is an exciting way to fish, either with light tackle or a fly rod. Boat manufacturers are designing boats that run and float in no water at all. Uninformed boat drivers run these shallow water craft right along the popular shorelines and “burn” flats and lakes “looking” for fish. Some airboat anglers are using illegal techniques such as “herding” redfish to catch them in shallow water back lakes. All of these things together have driven me to begin a search to find the un-fished fly waters on the Texas Coast.

This quest began in Baffin Bay. Although primarily known for its rock formations and legendary trophy trout, Baffin also has some of the most pristine and clear shallow water lakes and shorelines. Anglers don’t run shorelines in Baffin and most certainly don’t fish the back lakes on a regular basis. Most have bigger boats that relegate them to deeper water running and the fear of hitting rocks keeps most of them off of the shorelines and out of shallow water.

A complex and unique system, Baffin proper is an east-west running bay with many finger bays that feed off of it. Although connected to Baffin Bay, the Cayo del Grullo, Laguna Salada and Alazan are mini bay systems in and of themselves. Within these bay fingers are many protected shorelines, sand bars and back lakes, such as the Cayo de Infernillo in Alazan Bay. With one tiny entrance, the massive lake system on the King Ranch is the home to fish that have never seen a fly or boat, not to mention a kayak! A series of small lakes and protected shorelines line the eastern side of the Cayo del Grullo. Further back you’ll find a large, shallow, grassy system named Drum Point.

The Laguna Salada has a secret shallow water place mysteriously named “Site 55”. Muddy and grassy and almost never fished by a boat, schools of redfish, black drum and big trout haunt the shallow water there.

The entire south shoreline of Baffin is nothing but shallow grass and potholes with sandy bars and sloughs mixed in. On any sunny day in May and June, this shoreline is loaded with reds, trout and flounder lounging in just inches of water, ripe for a sightcaster to toss a fly to. One long pole, paddle or wade, this shoreline sees almost no pressure at all.

Moving toward the mouth of Baffin on the south is a big back lake called Los Corrales. Because the mouth of this lake is very skinny, big Baffin boats don’t dare to enter. Pristine grass and hungry fish await anyone who knows the way in. Fishing in this little lake can be an all-day affair, sightcasting with topwaters, spoons and plastics to reds, trout and black drum in the grassy shallows and sandy potholes.

Across the mouth of Baffin is the Tide Gauge Bar. Either on the bar, or on the shoreline, you’ll find no other poling skiff. Just outside of Baffin is the Meadows, then down south a little, Penescal Point, Rocky Slough and the Land Cut, all very lightly fished for shallow water and great for poling and paddling.

The legendary 9-Mile Hole is just a little farther south down the Intracoastal, for those who want to sightcast to gigantic redfish that never leave the area. Miles and miles of very shallow, clear water await those that commit to the one hour or more boat ride to get there.

Although there isn’t a Wal-Mart or an HEB or much civilization within close proximity, un-fished fly waters do await those who seek it. Riviera is home to a couple of great restaurants, however. The Kings Inn and the Baffin Bay CafĂ© serve fantastic food and plenty of it. So, for your commitment to fish these un-pressured places, you will be rewarded with pristine waters, hungry fish, the King Ranch and Kennedy Ranch shorelines and vistas, less boat traffic and some really good food.

Come with me on this journey to discover the un-fished fly waters in Texas. Just past Kingsville on Hwy 77, Riviera, Texas is worth the drive. The magic and mystery of Baffin Bay is here, along with great hospitality and the promise to satisfy the untiring sense of adventure that leads all anglers to the saltwater.

Capt. Sally Moffett
www.CaptainSally.com
email: Sally@CaptainSally.com
Blog: CaptSallysBlog.blogspot.com
Facebook: Sally Ann Moffett
Twitter: CaptainSally@twitter.com

Getting Back in the Swing of Things

After fishing the past 5 days, I'm really ready to get back into the swing of things. Fished Rockport 4 days, Baffin 1 day, had a mixed bag of results. The shallow water in Rockport is ON when the weather is warm, not so on, when the temperatures or wind is cold. We had a little of both. Baffin, on the other hand is just plain old on fire! Big trout and lots of them on topwaters and plastics where the order of the day.

Starting tomorrow, I'll be back in Rockport for two days, then Baffin for two. A mixed assortment of clients and fishing styles will really keep me on my toes! Friday, kayaking Rockport, Saturday, poling and fly fishing Rockport, Sunday, wadefishing for trophy trout in Baffin, Monday, poling and fly fishing in Baffin. Sounds like a fun weekend!

Friday, April 9, 2010

Had an interesting day of kayak fishing today. It was colder at the end of the day than when we started, blustery and cloudy. Saw quite a few redfish in the lee of the islands near oysters eating crab. Sightcasted to about 10 fish, all good sized. Fished Shamrock lakes today, water levels were low.

Monday, March 29, 2010

Great fishing this week in Rockport. Estes flats are full of nice reds and giant trout in 6 to 8" of water. Finally, the fish are starting to turn on!

Monday, March 8, 2010

Getting Ready to Get Back to Business!


We returned last night from a 5 day stand at the Houston Fishing Show. It was a blast, the crowds were thick and the atmosphere was optimistic for a great fishing season! Click here to see a .pdf of a full-page article about kayak fishing that appeared in the Houston Chronicle on Thursday.

Now, it's time to get back to the business of fishing! I'll be on the water tomorrow in Baffin, scouting for a photo shoot by Southwest Fly Fishing Magazine on Wednesday. Then, it's back to Rockport for a fishing trip on Thursday.

Friday, I'll be speaking at the Rockport Orvis (Swan Pointe Landing) Store at around 6:30pm. If you are in town, please stop by and listen. There will be food and beverages (the good kind), so enjoy a "fishing happy hour" with me!

Sunday, February 28, 2010

Shallow Water Fly Fishing in Rockport this Week

Finally, a little break in this long, long winter...!!! Poled the shallow water the past two days in Rockport with clients and found a good number of fish! What really surprised me, however, was where some of them were. With a cold wind blowing (although it was sunny), redfish were scattered on really shallow sand out in the open in the Brown and Root Flats! Also, there were groups of giant trout sitting next to some of the spoil islands on the Intracoastal in Redfish Bay. We had some great shots and the sunshine felt really good. I had the feeling that the fish really want it to be spring. Pods of hard heads were schooled up in the B&R with some redfish around them as well. This is the earliest that I've ever seen this phenomenon. I think the fish are just as sick of this cold weather as we all are!

Monday, February 22, 2010

Big Day on Baffin

In my new boat (a 2010 Curlew by NewWater Boatworks) with some great clients today, Mother Nature greeted us with an unexpectedly blustery day. Guiding with Capt. Aubrey Black and some of his clients, I've been trying my hand at learning a new bay system and fishing for trophy trout.

Well, one person in our group, Randy Pyle (a long-time client of Aubrey's and a great fisherman, too), caught a beautiful 28+" trout that weighed in at a little over 8 pounds today. The rest of us caught a few smaller trout, and three really nice redfish. But, overall, the day was a little tough, mostly because of the very blustery weather. We fished the South Shoreline of Baffin, the Meadows and the King Ranch Shoreline, looking for mullet in concentrations. The same group will be going out tomorrow and the weather doesn't sound any better, but now, because of that one gigantic trout, everyone has a strong desire to go, no matter what! That's fishin' for you!

Friday, February 12, 2010

I'm speaking tomorrow at Bass Pro in Pearland (Houston). Come to the fly shop, I'll be there all day! Check their website for seminar times.

Thursday, February 4, 2010

Heading to Houston to prepare for the Saltwater Sportsman Magazine National Seminar Series where I will be a featured speaker on Saturday!

Saturday, January 30, 2010

On the Zone 1300 Austin. Listen live right now on line www.longhornstation.com right now! Talking with the host Ken Milam in the studio right now!

Monday, January 25, 2010


There’s just one thing to say about the recent, long cold snap and it can’t be printed! For shallow water anglers, an extended cold and windy period of time means not many fish to cast at as they are “hunkered down” in the deeper, more protected areas of the bay system.

The Intracoastal Waterway and the spoil islands that line it are the most likely places to fish in the winter. When ever it actually does warm up, the wind slows down and the sun comes out, this is the first place predators and prey will move to, emerging from the deep holes there seeking warmth and eventually food.

In the Rockport area, the Intracoastal Waterway runs North-South. Poling skiff anglers could start poling in Estes Flats and end poling around Ingleside! Kayak fishermen put in at Hampton’s Landing and fish the spoils and high banks of Ransom Island, Dagger Island and the Intracoastal flats there, or put in at Conn Brown or Cove Harbor and approach fishing the same way.

At this time of the year and in some areas of the bay and flats, ducks and coots paddle around in big rafts. Feeding on the grass there and kicking around, they stir up the bottom and create off-colored water. On cloudy days when sight casting isn’t an option, blind cast soft plastics in these “ducky” places. Redfish and trout hang out below these birds, preying upon the life that has been dislodged by the birds feeding activity.
Be wary of tide movements now, avoiding cold incoming waters. Falling tides off of sun-warmed flats can create good feeding action on the shallow water edges of deeper bays and flats systems like South Bay and Brown and Root’s East Shore.

Fly fishermen must simply pick their day, but lure fishermen have a few more options. Prospecting deep potholes on flats near deeper water can be very productive with soft plastic paddletails, Corky’s, Catch 2000’s and crank baits. Moving the lure more slowly and near the bottom will produce the most strikes.

Another lure to toss during the winter is the Chattertube by Texas Rattlin’ Rigs. This lure is a plastic tube bait with a rattling chamber that can be used as a topwater, jerk bait or a slow sinking suspending bait, depending on the retrieve. Some of the best colors are Black/Chartreuse, Pumpkinseed/Chartreuse, Red/White and Red Shad, depending on water color and fishing conditions. The treble hook can be mounted near the front of the lure or at the back, depending upon fishing style and retrieve. Get some at www.texasrattlinrig.com. This lure, along with a Baby 1- crankbait work best when there is little or no floating grass.

Fly anglers toss bigger flies in natural colors on those days when the sun is out and the wind isn’t blowing too hard. Super clear water in the winter means longer, more accurate casting might be necessary, especially to those gigantic trout that lurk shallow. A good supply of dark grass still exists in and around the flats and spoil islands of the Intracoastal which collects warmth from the sun. This, along with a muddy bottom, some sand and shell and the proximity to the deep water of the Intracoastal make for a perfect winter fishing combination.

Finding water temperatures in the 60 degree range can be a challenge on some days, but on those days when the conditions are right, shallow water sight casting in the winter can be some of the best fishing of the entire year. Crystal clear water, easily targeted fishing places and hungry fish can make for an exciting fishing day!

Staying warm and dry is the key to having fun on the water in the winter. Don’t underestimate the layers of clothing necessary, along with ear covers and gloves. Layers can be removed if it warms up! Kayak fishermen must always wear waist belts on waders and PFD’s at all times when fishing deeper water. Waterproof gloves make paddling a kayak a little more fun when the water is cold as well.

Anglers in South Texas, are usually blessed with mild winters, but this year has proven to be an exception. Water temperatures in December fell to February levels. Let’s all hope for a return to “mild” very soon!

Sunday, January 10, 2010

Doing a live radio interview this morning on the Doug Pike show, 790AM in Houston, or on the Internet, 8-10am!